HIT ON LINKhttp://www.nicoletrunfio.netHIT ON LINKhttp://www.videobillboards.com.au/Nicole-trunfio/HIT ON PRESS RELEASEhttp://www.videobillboards.com.au/press/1465-NICOLE-TRUNFIO/Trunfio was the winner of the Australian version of the television series Search for a Supermodel and came third in the international version.She has modelled for various Australian as well as international designers including Chanel, Dolce & Gabbana, Versace, Christian Dior, Gucci, Fendi, Missoni, Roberto Cavalli, Vivienne Westwood, Valentino, Victoria's Secret, Sweetface, and Neiman Marcus. She has appeared in campaigns for Karl Lagerfeld, D&G, Sonia Rykiel, Lacoste, Sisley, Anne Taylor, BCBG Max Azria, Chadwick's and Guess. Trunfio has worked with photographers such as, Richard Avedon for Kenneth Cole campaign, Patrick Demarchilier for Harpers Bazaar, Steven Klein for D&G campaign, Peter Lindbergh for Italian Vogue, Terry Richardson for British Vogue, Greg Kadel, Melvin Sokosky,Russel James, and is the current face of Ulta.She has been passionate about acting since childhood, she has been studying in NYC for the past 3 years with people such as Susan Batson, Harold Guskin, Stella Adler Studio and is attending NIDA, and was featured in the Australian movie Two Fists, One Heart, she played the role of Italian temptress Jessica.She served as a mentor for the female models in the second season of the American version of Make Me a Supermodel.[2]Trunfio is represented by IMG Models in New York, Iconic Management in Berlin, Germany and Viviens Model Management in Australia.NICOLE TRUNFIO PORTFOLIOmodel models models modeling top model next model modelling americas next top model modelling agencies car model photographers male models female model modelling agency top models modeling agencies model agency new models model management female models modeling agency asian model victoria secret models victoria secret model elite models child models fashion model photo model model photo model pics model photos fashion models

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For Bookings: http://www.asiatravel.com/For More Video: http://book.asiatravel.com/video-travel_destinations.aspxA gemstone or gem (also called a precious or semi-precious stone) is a piece of attractive mineral, which—when cut and polished—is used to make jewelry or other adornments.[1] However certain rocks, (such as lapis-lazuli) and organic materials (such as amber or jet) are not minerals, but are still used for jewelry, and are therefore often considered to be gemstones as well. Most gemstones are hard, but some soft minerals are used in jewelry because of their lustre or other physical properties that have aesthetic value. Rarity is another characteristic that lends value to a gemstone. Apart from jewelry, from earliest antiquity until the 19th century engraved gems and hardstone carvings such as cups were major luxury art forms; the carvings of Carl Fabergé were the last significant works in this traditionThe traditional classification in the West, which goes back to the Ancient Greeks, begins with a distinction between precious and semi-precious stones; similar distinctions are made in other cultures. The precious stones are diamond, ruby, emerald and sapphire, with all other gemstones being semi-precious.[2] This distinction is unscientific and reflects the rarity of the respective stones in ancient times, as well as their quality – all are translucent with fine color in their purest forms, except for the colorless diamond, and very hard,[3] with hardnesses of 8-10 on the Mohs scale. Other stones are classified by their color, translucency and hardness. The traditional distinction does not necessarily reflect modern values, for example, while garnets are relatively inexpensive, a green garnet called Tsavorite, can be far more valuable than an mid-quality emerald.[4] Another unscientific term for semi-precious gemstones used in art history and archaeology is hardstone.In modern times gemstones are identified by gemologists, who describe gems and their characteristics using technical terminology specific to the field of gemology. The first characteristic a gemologist uses to identify a gemstone is its chemical composition. For example, diamonds are made of carbon (C) and rubies of aluminium oxide (Al2O3). Next, many gems are crystals which are classified by their crystal system such as cubic or trigonal or monoclinic. Another term used is habit, the form the gem is usually found in. For example diamonds, which have a cubic crystal system, are often found as octahedrons.Gemstones are classified into different groups, species, and varieties. For example, ruby is the red variety of the species corundum, while any other color of corundum is considered sapphire. Emerald (green), aquamarine (blue), bixbite (red), goshenite (colorless), heliodor (yellow), and morganite (pink) are all varieties of the mineral species beryl.Gems are characterized in terms of refractive index, dispersion, specific gravity, hardness, cleavage, fracture, and luster. They may exhibit pleochroism or double refraction. They may have luminescence and a distinctive absorption spectrum.Material or flaws within a stone may be present as inclusions.Color is the most obvious and attractive feature of gemstones. The color of any material is due to the nature of light itself. Daylight, often called white light, is actually a mixture of different colors of light. When light passes through a material, some of the light may be absorbed, while the rest passes through. The part that is not absorbed reaches the eye as white light minus the absorbed colors. A ruby appears red because it absorbs all the other colors of white light – blue, yellow, green, etc. – except red.The same material can exhibit different colors. For example ruby and sapphire have the same chemical composition (both are corundum) but exhibit different colors. Even the same gemstone can occur in many different colors: sapphires show different shades of blue and pink and "fancy sapphires" exhibit a whole range of other colors from yellow to orange-pink, the latter called "Padparadscha sapphire".This difference in color is based on the atomic structure of the stone. Although the different stones formally have the same chemical composition, they are not exactly the same. Every now and then an atom is replaced by a completely different atom (and this could be as few as one in a million atoms). These so called impurities are sufficient to absorb certain colors and leave the other colors unaffected.As an example: beryl, which is colorless in its pure mineral form, becomes emerald with chromium impurities. If you add manganese instead of chromium, beryl becomes pink morganite. With iron, it becomes aquamarine.Some gemstone treatments make use of the fact that these impurities can be "manipulated", thus changing the color of the gem.Info Taken from Wikipedia.comCredits to wikipedia.comhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gem_stone

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Check out our fashion highlight Item of the Week. Hot Summer Wrap Dresses. Perfect for summer days by the pool and on the beach. With a few knots and ties the wrap dress becomes extremely versatile in any setting.Brought to you by:http://www.discountwomensdressshoes.comRed Hawaiian Flower Wrap Sarong Convertible Dresshttp://bit.ly/dwdshoes-46143-Red-Flower-SarongMulti Tie Dye Hippie Wrap Sarong Convertible Dresshttp://bit.ly/dwdshoes-46167-Tie-Dye-SarongPurple Leopard Wrap Sarong Convertible Beach Dresshttp://bit.ly/dwdshoes-46142-Purple-Leopard-SarongBrown Leopard Wrap Sarong Convertible Beach Dresshttp://bit.ly/dwdshoes-46144-Brown-Leopard-SarongBlack White Leaves Wrap Sarong Convertible Dresshttp://bit.ly/dwdshoes-46146-Black-White-Palm-SarongBlue Peace Sign Wrap Sarong Convertible Pool Dresshttp://bit.ly/dwdshoes-46145-Blue-Peace-SarongThanks for watching:http://www.discountwomensdressshoes.comFind us on Facebook & Twitter:http://www.facebook.com/dwdshoeshttp://twitter.com/dwdshoes

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Jack and Geoff do a bit of hippie-hunting in Dead Rising 2 and pick off the crazy hippie Brandon in the bathroom. Nice dreads, jerkface.

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Esha Deol, Hema Malini, Neetu Chandra and Aryan Vaid walk the ramp in Italian Jewellery at the India International Jewellery Week also known as IIJW 2010.

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Bjørg Jewellery Promo 2009.http://www.bjorgjewellery.comDirected by: Matias & Mathiashttp://www.matiasmathias.comMusic by: Bengt Hanssen

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